Free sex chat 0800 Victorian time dating

The Victorians have a reputation for being prim, proper and persnickety.

As a member of the upper class in Victorian England (during the reign of Queen Victoria, 1837-1901), one had to know the exhaustive rules of etiquette that went along with one's position.

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In the Victorian Era, etiquette lubricated the mechanism of social exchange: There were rules for making new friends, keeping up with old friends and even cutting out morally dubious friends.

But most importantly, knowing the rules helped one show respect for everyone else, including servants, acquaintances, nobility and clergy. It was evident to many even then — social critics of the time popularly mocked the more ridiculous elements of Victorian society.

From buying a woman dinner to opening a door for her, many of today's courting rituals are rooted in medieval chivalry.

During medieval times, the importance of love in a relationship emerged as a reaction to arranged marriages, but was still not considered a prerequisite in matrimonial decisions.

Families who took part in the event had one goal in mind: To find their daughter a suitor.

No matter where they lived, the Victorian elite would send their daughters — in their mid teens and early twenties — to London for the sake of encountering a potential match.During the Victorian Era (1837-1901), romantic love became viewed as the primary requirement for marriage and courting became even more formal - almost an art form among the upper classes.An interested gentleman could not simply walk up to a young lady and begin a conversation.The most important element of The Season took place in the Coming Out, or the presentation of young women before the King and Queen by their mothers, aunts, or other female relative.Even though the actual presentation only lasted a few moments for each girl, the planning would start months, if not years, prior.In the Victorian era, many saw marriage as an economic arrangement from which the families of both the bride and groom — though often the groom — would benefit.