sophie dahl dating Research radiocarbon dating and the shroud of turin

The results provide conclusive evidence that the linen of the Shroud of Turin is mediaeval.New scientific tests on the Shroud of Turin, which was on display Saturday in a special TV appearance introduced by the Pope, dates the cloth to ancient times, challenging earlier experiments dating it only to the Middle Ages.."Today, thanks to a multidisciplinary work promoted by the University of Padua and lasting fifteen years, the team led by Giulio Fanti shows that the radiocarbon dating has been distorted by environmental contamination, and goes right back to the early death of Jesus that traces of dust, pollen and spores from the Middle East to direct, that the body has been depicted on the linen, violence told in the Gospels of the Passion, and the image was produced by the exceptional radiation developed at the time of the resurrection.

However, no plausible explanation has been offered for the source of the radiation.

Now Carpinteri’s team have hypothesized that high-frequency pressure waves generated in the Earth’s crust during earthquakes are the source of such neutron emissions.

Very small samples from the Shroud of Turin have been dated by accelerator mass spectrometry in laboratories at Arizona, Oxford and Zurich.

As controls, three samples whose ages had been determined independently were also dated.

You can find a more detailed report about their research on the .

The third was a multi-parametric mechanical test based on five different mechanical parameters linked to the voltage of the wire.This flood of neutrons may have imprinted an X-ray-like image onto the linen burial cloth, say the researches.In addition, the radiation emissions would have increased the level of carbon-14 isotopes in the Shroud, which would make it appear younger."We believe it is possible that neutron emissions by earthquakes could have induced the image formation on the Shroud's linen fibres, through thermal neutron capture on nitrogen nuclei, and could also have caused a wrong radiocarbon dating," said Professor Alberto Carpinteri, from the Politecnico di Torino.The Shroud has attracted widespread interest ever since Secondo Pia took the first photograph of it in 1898 which showed details which could not be seen by the naked eye.The Shroud of Turin, shown in 1979, is a 14-foot linen revered by some as the burial cloth of Jesus.